What is Arthritis?

*Always Remember: Physical Activity can reduce pain and improve physical function by about 40%

Arthritis is very common but not well understood. Actually, “arthritis” is not a single disease; it is an informal way of referring to joint pain or joint disease. There are more than 100 different types of arthritis (see Appendix) and related conditions. People of all ages, genders and races have arthritis, the leading cause of disability in the United States. We don’t know the true number of people with arthritis because many people don’t seek treatment until their symptoms become severe. Conservative estimates only include those who report they have doctor diagnosed arthritis, indicating that about 54 million adults and almost 300,000 children “officially” have arthritis or another type of rheumatic disease. A recent study says as many as 91 million Americans may really have arthritis – when you add together those who are officially diagnosed plus those who report obvious symptoms but haven’t been diagnosed.

While researchers try to find more accurate ways to estimate the prevalence of this disease and the burdens it causes, we do know that it is more common among women and that the number of people of all ages with arthritis is increasing.

Stem Cell Basics

Stem cells are cells with the potential to develop into many different types of cells in the body. They serve as a repair system for the body. There are two main types of stem cells: embryonic stem cells and adult stem cells.

Stem cells are different from other cells in the body in three ways:

-They can divide and renew themselves over a long time
-They are unspecialized, so they cannot do specific functions in the body
-They have the potential to become specialized cells, such as muscle cells, blood cells, and brain cells

Doctors and scientists are excited about stem cells because they could help in many different areas of health and medical research. Studying stem cells may help explain how serious conditions such as birth defects and cancer come about. Stem cells may one day be used to make cells and tissues for therapy of many diseases. Examples include Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, spinal cord injury, heart disease, diabetes, and arthritis.

Source – NIH: National Institutes of Health
Read More Here

FOLLOW UP STUDY PROVES SAFETY AND EFFICACY OF STEM CELLS FOR BACK PAIN

81% OF PARTICIPANTS AVOIDED BACK SURGERY TWO YEARS LATER WITHOUT COMPLICATIONS

The Article Accepted and Published by The US National Library of Medicine, featured in International Orthopaedics on July 10, 2015; “Treatment of discogenic back pain with autologous bone marrow concentrate injection with minimum two year follow-up.” Show there were no complications from the percutaneous bone marrow aspiration or disc injection. Of 26 patients, 24 (92 %) avoided surgery through 12 months, while 21 (81 %) avoided surgery through two years. Total and rate of pain reduction were linked to mesenchymal stem cell concentration through 12 months. Only five of the 26 patients elected to undergo surgical intervention (fusion or artificial disc replacement) by the two year milestone. in conclusion, this study provides evidence of safety and feasibility in the non-surgical treatment of discogenic pain with autologous BMC, with durable pain relief (71 % VAS reduction) and ODI improvements (> 64 %) through two years. Read the Complete Article Here

Stem Cell Basics

  • Introduction: What are stem cells, and why are they important?
  • What are the unique properties of all stem cells?
  • What are embryonic stem cells?
  • What are adult stem cells?
  • What are the similarities and differences between embryonic and adult stem cells?
  • What are induced pluripotent stem cells?
  • What are the potential uses of human stem cells and the obstacles that must be overcome before these potential uses will be realized?
  • Where can I get more information?
Read the answers clicking this link.

PRP & Knee Meniscus News

See more information about PRP & Knee Meniscus: Click Here

 

Treatment of Knee Meniscus Pathology: Rehabilitation, Surgery, and Orthobiologics.

Abstract

The meniscal tear treatment paradigm traditionally begins with conservative measures such as physical therapy with referral for operative management for persistent or mechanical symptoms. As a result, the partial meniscectomy is performed more than any other orthopedic procedure in the United States. This treatment paradigm has shifted as recent literature supports the attempt to preserve or repair the meniscus whenever possible given its importance for the structural integrity of the knee joint and the risk of early osteoarthritis associated after meniscus excision. Choosing an appropriate management strategy depends on multiple factors such as patient demographics and location of the tear. Physical therapy remains a first line treatment for knee pain secondary to meniscus tear and should be pursued in the setting of both acute and chronic knee pain. Furthermore, there is a growing amount of evidence showing that elderly patients with complex meniscus tears in the setting of degenerative arthritis should not undergo arthroscopic surgery. Direct meniscus repair remains an option in ideal patients who are young, healthy, and have tears near the more vascular periphery of the meniscus but are not suitable for all patients. Use of orthobiologics such as platelet rich plasma and mesenchymal stem cells show promise in augmenting surgical repairs or as stand-alone treatments though research for use in meniscal tear management is limited.
Source: Click Here https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30195704
  • 01
  • 02
  • 03
  • 04
  • 05
  • 06
  • 07
  • 08
  • 09
  • 10
Beauty Medical Touch

E-mail Us

contact@beautymedicaltouch-usa.com

Visit Us

16536 N. Dale Mabry Hwy.
Tampa, FL 33618

Give us a call

(813) 997-9221